056 | Security is Your Competitive Marketing Advantage in HealthTech | Joe Scotto, CyberMDX | Studio CMO

Podcast by | July 9, 2021 HealthTech, Marketing Strategy

As of June 30, 2021, the ten largest reported healthcare data breaches have compromised the protected health information of 16-million patients. During the first six months of 2020, 3.5-million individuals had been compromised.

Now more than ever, security is a top-level concern for every healthcare provider.

Every HealthTech solution requires integration into the data system of the provider and requires access to the data. How can your target customer—the CIO—keep all that data safe from bad actors? It’s a near-impossible task.

Do you understand the battles CIOs are fighting right now? Do you know how to communicate how your solution will keep them secure or protect from intrusion? We discuss the marketing implications of security on this edition of Studio CMO.

About Our Guest

Joe Scotto has served as Chief Marketing Officer at CyberMDX for over a year. His 30-year marketing career has included stints as a marketing leader at Indegy, BAE Systems, Avaya and Time Warner. While CMO for Indegy, Joe positioned the company as a leader in the OT Security market category, creating breakthrough programs to drive market awareness and thought leadership. Joe has used his broad experience to build and lead marketing teams for a variety of global B2B organizations in the technology, defense, telecom, and publishing industries.

Show Notes

You're Invited to Breakfast at HIMSS 2021

The size of HIMSS can be overwhelming. Especially after a year at home facing a computer screen.

We want to foster deeper connections and real conversation.

We are hosting two breakfasts for small groups of HealthTech marketing professionals at HIMSS 2021. Details of the breakfast will be sent to those who RSVP. Please fill out the form below to reserve your chair.

The Dos and Don’ts of Presenting Your Security Story

Do… be specific. Talk about exactly how your solution integrates with different security protocols

Do… be authentic. Tell the truth about how you address security.

Do… borrow credibility. Your customers’ testimonies about your product will move your prospects.

Do… practice empathy. Knowing and understanding the pressure on the CIOs and the challenges they face should influence how you address them.

Don’t… try to be cute. Humor and sarcasm can backfire in a security conversation.

Don’t… fear monger. Your prospect is already afraid. Don’t rely on fear to motivate. Encourage and point to the solution.

“I greatly admire CIOs and CISOs. More and more, they’re becoming risk managers. They’re not just protecting operations, data, and financial reputation, they’re actually protecting lives.” — Joe Scotto, CMO of CyberMDX

“How Hospital Hacks Happen” Video Series

Find more videos here.

Transcript

John Farkas:

The Chief Information Officer, if you are marketing a HealthTech solution that has anything at all to do with information stores or data transfer, and let’s face it, most everything does in our world today, then CIO is likely on your list of important buyers or at least critical influencers. And I’m here to tell you, they are a challenging group right now. As the healthcare world opens its gates to the likes of telemedicine and the onslaught of connected devices and the increasing number of solutions that want some form of access to data. And in some form or fashion, it’s really set their world spinning. And you add that the fact that they carry this mandate to somehow keep all that data safe from bad actors, they have an impossible task.

John Farkas:

Now sometimes the CIO exists on the same side of the org as the CTO. And in those cases, the CIO is more focused on the business clinical outcomes, while the CTO zeroes in on maintenance and development of the tools and the tech stack of the hospital. But typically, the CIO has to strategically coordinate IT solutions to the healthcare challenges of specific care sites, and balance that with the creation and management of an integrated systemwide network. So they’re increasingly shedding their historical IT gatekeeper image and taking on a more strategic business-focused, bottom-line role in the hospital to help the organization excel. So you have to understand the battles they’re fighting right now. And if you’re wanting their attention, you better know what it means to hand them the tools they need to win the war. That is what we’re going to be talking about today on Studio CMO.

Mark Whitlock:

Welcome to Studio CMO, you’re listening to the podcast where we help HealthTech marketing leaders understand their market position better than ever before and figure out a way to build demand generation programs that change not only the lives of their customers, but the course of their companies as well. My name is Mark Whitlock and I’m alongside today my fellow co-host, Anna Grimes, one of the account managers for Golden Spiral, which is the agency that brings you Studio CMO. And Anna, are your doors locked? Do you have locks and all that good stuff on your house?

Anna Grimes:

I do. I must say that I’m not the most secure, I don’t have ring cameras or anything like that, good old deadbolts and all that good stuff. But yes, and probably more aware of the threats to information capture through my electronic devices than I am through anybody walking through the wrong door at the wrong time.

Mark Whitlock:

Got it. And leading our conversation today is our host, the CEO and Chief storyteller of Golden Spiral, John Farkas and, John, I know you probably had to use your key fob and three keys to get into the office today, if not more. And security is something that’s been on your mind and your heart for a number of years with our clients.

John Farkas:

Absolutely, I mean, it’s a really critical aspect. And like I mentioned in the setup here, it’s a super significant component of business solutions now. We’ve got to keep things secure, it’s an increasing threat. And the ability to mitigate that and keep it at bay needs to be front and center for anybody that touches information.

Mark Whitlock:

And that’s why we’ve invited our guests on the program today. His company has taken such a serious look at this. They are sponsoring the cybersecurity command center at HIMSS, coming up in just a few weeks.

Anna Grimes:

And we are so glad to have Joe Scotto from CyberMDX here. Joe is the Chief Marketing Officer at CyberMDX. He has been there for about a year. His 30 year marketing career has included stints as a marketing leader at Indegy B-A-E systems, Avaya and Time Warner. While CMO for Indegy, Joe positioned the company as a leader in the OT security market category, creating breakthrough programs to drive market awareness and thought leadership. Joe has used his broad experience to build and lead marketing teams for a variety of global B2B organizations in the Technology, Defense, Telecom and Publishing industry. So Welcome to Studio CMO. We’re based here in soupy hot Nashville and we’re glad to have you.

Joe Scotto:

I’m glad to be here, Anna from soupy hot New York.

Anna Grimes:

After all, it is June 29th.

Mark Whitlock:

Indeed.

John Farkas:

The year of the heat dome.

Joe Scotto:

For sure.

John Farkas:

So Joe, I’d love for you to give us a sense of what your company does and why you guys are focused in the context of the healthcare space.

Joe Scotto:

CyberMDX, if I had to describe it, we’re people and we’re technology that’s dedicated to protecting our healthcare. We protect the things that protect human lives. This is why everybody in the company wakes up every morning supercharged to take on the day, it’s what motivates you. The “things” part in the tagline refers to Internet of Things, where an IoT security provider, which includes not just the operational devices that are connected in most healthcare organizations, but more importantly, the medical devices, right. So that’s really a very, very strong tie in terms of delivering healthcare and protecting it.

John Farkas:

I know that threats are evolving quick. I know that there’s a lot going on in the space all the time. And what are some of the things that are headlining right now, some of the concerns that have made their way to the forefront for healthcare organizations?

Joe Scotto:

Obviously, the number of attacks is escalating every day. Ransomware is rampant. There’s lots of different types of malware out there. From the REvil and Ryuk, DarkSide, there’s just one every other day, it seems. And that’s obviously on the minds of lots of CISOs and CIOs that work in these organizations. The things that I think they’re worried about include staying operational, right? A hospital can’t afford to not be 24/7. And so when your organization is being held ransom, and they’re not allowing you into the data, for example, not to mention just overall operations, right, let’s just start with the data. If you can’t determine what someone’s medication is, or whose lab chart this is, you can see right there how it’s a massive threat to not just quality care, but healthcare itself.

Joe Scotto:

Beyond that, there are also financial implications. There are regulatory implications, HIPAA, right. And now, if the data of your patients is compromised, the implications are like lawsuits, reputational damage, et cetera. So overall, it’s something that every, not just CIO and CISO needs to care about, but the CEO, as well. And the board needs to really care about.

John Farkas:

When you look at the fact that the people that we’re selling into, the people that organizations are looking at are very concerned about information security as they need to be. As you think about how a HealthTech company that is putting ideas forward to the market can represent their stance on security, how would you approach that? What are some of the hot buttons that they can be aware of, and the ways that you can be engaging the market with your stance in the context of privacy and security?

Joe Scotto:

I think there are some do’s and some don’ts associated with that. You have to be authentic. I think that’s a big part of what defines CyberMDX. When you go to our website, you’ll see that what we say is we believe that medical device security is essential to delivering healthcare. And that is what drives everything. And that’s what you want to get everybody focused on the mission. And then you want to get everybody focused on the market to understand what they want and the different personas that you’re talking to, and how they’re looking at the world because obviously, they’re different. Those are some of the do’s. Some of the don’ts would be, don’t try to be cute about things, don’t. This is not the place to do that.

Joe Scotto:

There are certain situations where you can get away with that, but you just have to be really careful. Don’t fear monger. It’s a serious situation. So you have to consider who you’re talking to, the subject matter that you’re discussing. And then really, really think on what you’re saying.

John Farkas:

We have to have a very clear problems focused and so knowing who in the organizations you’re talking to have security as their primary concern and as it pertains to your solution. What are the vectors that they’re most interested in making sure are covered? And how can you articulate that really clearly to them, that you are mindful of that, that you have solutions in place. And so obviously, taking a needs focused approach is paramount. And that’s certainly something we talk about often here, Joe. So you’re among friends.

Joe Scotto:

For sure. This is interesting. I would say I’d start at the top level, healthcare security right now is evolving, and I seem to gravitate toward technologies that are in the middle of some sort of convergence, I go back to my telecom days, it was voice and data. When I went to BAE systems, it was financial crime analytics and cybersecurity, because nine out of 10 times somebody was going after the money when they were committing cyber crime, right? I moved on to Indegy, and there was the convergence of the OT network, and the IT network, OT engineering and IT and critical infrastructure coming together.

Joe Scotto:

Here in healthcare security, you have biomedical engineers and technicians managing the lifecycle of medical devices, and then you have IT trying to protect everything. Those are different things, right, a server is different from an infusion pump. So, John, I think getting back to your question, when you think about how that sort of plays out to the different personas, you need to understand each person’s world and where they’re coming from in this convergence. And that is important for us to understand biomedical and how they think, and what’s important to them, and what they need, versus the CIO organization, which has different needs. And of course, there’s the security aspect, which is IT security.

Joe Scotto:

The other element that makes it a bit more complex, is the segment size of these healthcare providers. So typically, when hospitals are large, they have more formal organizations that have a dedicated CISO, and a security team. As hospitals get smaller, you’re going to see less of that. And so the CIO organization is going to manage everything, but they’re not necessarily going to have a CISO, or even a dedicated security team or potentially outsource that. So all of that understanding has to come together. And then in terms of crafting your messaging, and building your story for each, you really need to understand everybody’s world, and then speak to it.

John Farkas:

And that brings in a good point. I mean, you are not only equipping healthcare organizations in cybersecurity, but you’re also selling into healthcare organizations. So you’re what we call here on Studio CMO world, the double agent. So who are some of the primary personas that you’re selling into?

Joe Scotto:

So we bifurcated pretty much in sort of the order that I mentioned, you’ve got to understand IT and that could be an IT manager, it could be somebody in infrastructure, it could be data security. So those personas in on the IT side, which could be specifically in the CIO organization, or they could be specifically inside of a security team. And then on the other side, you have biomedical engineers and technicians. And again, their primary role is a lifecycle management of the medical devices. So now, if you’re managing something that inherently does not have security built in, but can potentially become an attack vector for a bad actor, you obviously are concerned about that. But security is not your thing. So these two teams have to work together. That’s one of the good things about what we do, through our solution, our software. It’s sort of like a single source of truth for all of the teams to go and get the information that they need, and consume it in the way that they are accustomed to.

John Farkas:

So let’s talk for a minute about the CIO organization, because one of the things I know is that of the market vectors that exist on the planet, that group is among the most targeted B2B segment of humanity that exists. Would you agree with that?

Joe Scotto:

Sure.

John Farkas:

Talk about some of the challenges that you’ve seen, in particular with reaching that group. And what are some of the things that you’re doing from a marketing perspective to jump in there in the conversation with them?

Joe Scotto:

First of all, it’s a group that I greatly admire, because they’re going through a lot right now. And I think that when you look at CIOs, CISOs, even CEOs, more and more, they’re all becoming risk managers. And it’s such a critical role today, especially in healthcare, because as I mentioned earlier, you’re not just protecting operations, data, financial reputation, you’re actually protecting lives. So that’s something that I think weighs heavily on them.

Joe Scotto:

And you need to factor in that it’s a fight for them every day, because they don’t have a lot of control over all of that, you’ve heard the expression before, it’s not a matter of if it’s a matter of when, if somebody wants to get in, they’re going to get in. And they know that and so when you factor in all of these elements that they can’t control, they can’t control what users open up which emails, they don’t have any control over which devices get installed in the network, somebody could bring an Alexa device into a kitchen in the hospital and they won’t know that.

Joe Scotto:

So there’s a lot of that in their world that is not easy to manage. They have to also balance a lot of the pressure that they get from the C suite, which is trying to grow, right. And so they want to invest in technologies that make things more efficient and clearly, when you say more efficient means more connected. So that’s another vector. When you look at things like telehealth, telemedicine, these are technologies that are coming very fast at them, it’s a big trend that’s going to impact them and so lots on their plate. How we get through to them is through our message but we pretty much do so many different types of programs.

Joe Scotto:

And my view, John is, I’m not an attribution kind of guy, I want to know what programs are successful, I want to be able to measure the data of how well they perform, I want to be able to measure how well one vendor does it versus another vendor. But ultimately, I’m looking at the buyer journey. And I want to make sure that I am having enough touch points, so that one of them is going to capture their attention, whether it’s content syndication, or we just did a panel event this week, we do some creative things with events, I have a fantastic event planner, and she’s always innovating there to figure out ways to pull people in.

Joe Scotto:

But ultimately, what matters is what you say, especially with this audience, they don’t like fluff. They want you to get right to the point. And if you do that, and if you deliver it and if you deliver it consistently, then you’ll be able to penetrate through what is yeah, you’re right, a very tough audience to get through to.

John Farkas:

And I’m hearing you do what’s necessary to get through the tough audience. I mean, you can’t use cybersecurity terms. You can’t just pick one attack vector?

Joe Scotto:

Absolutely.

John Farkas:

You have to come at it from a number of different directions because you’re competing, especially with that persona. I love how you led this part of the discussion, Joe, because you said you really have a lot of empathy for that group of people, they are being asked to do a whole lot of change, management, innovation, expansion of their role and looking at, as people are asking for, and this is a big part of what’s happening in the context of healthcare, people are asking for the expansion of digital channels. Fine, except for every one of those digital channels is a threat. And so I have to figure out how I’m going to look at my organization, open it further up and keep it more secure.

Joe Scotto:

Exactly. It’s a perfect stop.

John Farkas:

It’s a really difficult moment for them. Because yeah, telehealth, huge innovation really needed. Going to be the future of healthcare, and multiple new vectors, multiple new directions that things are coming from. Connected devices, huge opportunity, great opportunity to manage things better in more efficient ways with fewer people and all the things that are great equations for the CEO in the bottom line, and every one of them that’s a connect point, is a new vulnerability. And so you’ve got this really challenging job of managing all of those incomings. I know this because any one of the folks that we work with are asking something of the CIOs infrastructure. We are all asking them to accommodate something. And just multiply that out across an entire health system.

John Farkas:

I know in our little world that we have effect over, I can think of a number of different entities that have really good cases of reasons why a health system should pay attention to something that they are putting forward. And I also know that every one of them puts a new backpack, on the CIO organization, something, they’ve got to figure out how to carry. So it’s really important to your point, Joe, to have some empathy for those people, and realize that they have got what really is an impossible task right now. The fact that it does take a while to sell into them, it does take a while to get a hearing, it does take a while to persuade, and to help them into understanding, you better be looking out for their interests actively, and the context of your approach to market because they’ll throw up a flag really quickly, because it’s really hard for them to take on anymore.

Joe Scotto:

Exactly.

John Farkas:

What have you done to put your arms around those people, you have to really kind of walk along with them? Is there some initiatives? Is there some things you’ve done from a marketing perspective, to really demonstrate your empathy and understanding for what’s going on there?

Joe Scotto:

Yeah, so the thing that comes to mind is what we do in our research group. So we have a dedicated research team that basically looks for vulnerabilities in medical devices. And this is something that we do, where we work with the manufacturers of the devices. And then we work with regulatory bodies like CISA, and the FDA, we work with MITRE. And we basically, look to the community, we contribute to the community by finding those vulnerabilities and then helping the manufacturers with and then of course, CISA providing the advisory, and then the mechanisms, and ways that they can help to protect bad actors from getting in.

Joe Scotto:

So that’s one of the biggest things that we do to really just help. And when you look at the mission of CISA, and the FDA and MITRE, we’re kind of tied to that to help them with their mission. We have someone who heads up that organization, his name is Elad Luz. And Elad and his team have found 15 vulnerabilities in just the last couple of years. So I think that’s a real key way that we’re helping to try to make this world a little bit more safer.

John Farkas:

And a great underscore, I think one of the most valuable assets you can forward to your market in the context of meaningful assertions is anything that is clearly researched based, and gives them a better platform to stand on in their work in doing their own jobs. Because if you can help them become authority, if you can help them get command over the subject matter, you’ve become an ally in one form or another. And the moment you’ve taken that step from being somebody where they’re just seeing you show up to where you’re further equipping them or getting them more command over what it is they do, that is a valuable place to be. And so thinking through what can you do in the context of your world that would better equip them to do their jobs?

Joe Scotto:

Yeah. And actually, John, you just reminded me of something else that I forgot about last October, for cybersecurity month, October is cybersecurity month, and we launched an awareness campaign. We built several videos, use case videos that helped to educate the market on how hospital hacks happen. That was actually the name of the campaign. And we tied it to the Department of Homeland security’s theme, and built that out and just promoted the idea and tried to promote the message.

John Farkas:

That’s awesome.

Anna Grimes:

Shifting to helping your clients navigate a breach because as you said, it’s not a question of if, it’s a question of when. Do you all ever get involved with providing them some direction on their own crisis communications council, because it would seem to me that you all alongside having the actual, true expertise with cybersecurity, you probably would have seen quite a few, both triumphs and missteps, when it comes to actually the communications component that goes into managing a breach.

Joe Scotto:

I don’t know that we get involved with that aspect of it, because our focus is on the preventative side. We want you to lock this down and be able to mitigate it and remediate it, right?

Anna Grimes:

Right.

Joe Scotto:

But we do offer, if somebody does get breached, absolutely, they can call us. And we have an amazing support team and a team of cyber analysts that absolutely can help them, should they come across that situation.

Anna Grimes:

Yeah, I feel like they should go hand-in-hand in it with my marketing and communications hat on, it sort of strikes me that that is a helpful thing to be able to offer is to be able to speak knowledgeably into talking points about the breach and how your client is educating their patients and select audiences to make sure that they’ve got the information they need. Not too much, not too little, et cetera.

Joe Scotto:

Yeah, and we do a very proactive effort is where anything has to do with IoT security, or there is a CISA advisory on a medical device, for sure, we will educate our entire database, and of course, our customers and make sure that they’re well protected from it.

Mark Whitlock:

I loved hearing about those videos that you produced. And you also talked earlier about how content is such a big part of what you do at CyberMDX. It’s a big part of what HealthTech companies do as part of their marketing as well. I was wondering, are there ways that HealthTech companies can talk about security that, and not looking for secret words and phrases and such, but is there a way they can talk about security in such a way that kind of communicate, we know what you’re talking about, we have the good housekeeping seal of approval on our products, that will help you further down the road.

Joe Scotto:

That to me speaks to credibility, your customers are your greatest form of credibility. But there’s also analyst reports and we’re in the Forrester wave for medical device security. We’ve got our Frost and Sullivan award, we’re in the Gartner medical device, journey guide. And we’ve got the most reviews, the most five star reviews on Pure Insights. So so there’s a lot of that that I’d like to just kind of put out there to let others speak to what we do. As far as how we actually approach it and talk to it. Again, Mark, I’d go to sort of what I said before about making sure that it’s more factual and direct, doesn’t look like fluff, I think it’s really important for both biomedical and IT and security where they just want you to tell them how you’re going to help get a direct understanding of how it fits in their network, how it integrates with their network is also a really important thing. Those are a lot of the elements that we focus on.

Joe Scotto:

And I would say, there are statistics out there already that tell you that 70% of the time, when you start talking to a customer, they’ve already learned about everything you do from your website, right? So that was one of the first things that when I came aboard CyberMDX that we want to tackle and we launched a brand new site and built all the content from the ground up and that launch February 1st. So I can proudly say I have no problem with them doing that.

Mark Whitlock:

So John, that goes to what you’ve talked about so many times that self-service sale

John Farkas:

Exactly.

Joe Scotto:

It’s the education part, right? The sale’s going to come later, but as long as you’re carrying them through the journey, and that’s really the first part about it, they’re able to sort of look at you, all right, I understand what they’re saying. I like what they’re saying, others are talking about them. You sort of getting all of that you could see it all on the website. And then you get to that piece where you say, okay, I want to talk to these guys. Now I’m down to this level. And let’s talk specific product. And that’s where you get into the demo portion and you start to get more into cell mode.

Mark Whitlock:

Exactly.

John Farkas:

So let’s take a minute and talk about that because as much as I would like to think that our listeners are all in organizations that understand the new way that market is engaging. I know that’s not true because I know that we’re dealing with a lot of people who because it’s healthcare, there’s still a lot of traditional modality that people are hanging on to where sales happens in the much of the traditional way. And so it doesn’t look like the new funnel. But if you’re talking to a leader of an organization, trying to help them into the new reality, how would you express what’s really going on in the market and what engagement looks like?

Joe Scotto:

It’s so different from the way it was. And I think that there’s an old school thought that ties very closely to attribution of individual things. And again, as I said before, while we want to make sure that our investments are working for us, and we get the data back, and we make sure that the leads that we’re pulling in are actually people who are in our target market, who are target personas. And then you can compare how one vendor is doing against another, all of that is good. But you just can’t get into that silly game of trying to choose your future investments based on whether they gave you an upward lead. You need to really just define the buyers journey, and a multi touch program, refine your marketing mix, really focus on engagement upfront, make sure your content is really speaking to your market.

Joe Scotto:

It’s different now in the sense that a lot of that all happens without you really knowing sometimes, and you don’t really have a way to measure it, you don’t know all the PR that you’re doing, necessarily who’s reading it, and who’s walking away thinking, oh, wow, these people are really sharp. And I like the way they think or whatever, that stuff that you hope happens based on what you put out there.

Joe Scotto:

And you will find out, you’ll get anecdotal feedback, but you have to have some faith. And this gets into like marketing is art and science, right? So there’s the science part, which is great today, because with account based marketing and the content syndication programs, you can get some really, really specific data points about what your investment is doing. And that’s great. But the art part about it is your gut. And you got to know what’s right in the mix, what’s potentially missing, what feels a bit off in terms of a message and all of that, I just think comes with lots of experience and trial and error.

Anna Grimes:

It would seem to me, Joe, that you’re a cybersecurity firm, you would have plenty of competitors, but there’s definitely a felt need for your product, or your services [crosstalk 00:32:59].

Joe Scotto:

Absolutely.

Anna Grimes:

But I’m sure there are times when prospects get stuck in the funnel. Where have you seen that sticking point occur? And what have you guys done to address that?

Joe Scotto:

Sure. Yeah, the thing that comes to mind is when I describe the different groups that are involved or touch the decision that can sometimes slow the decision in larger hospitals if the IT team gets it. And then they have to run it by the biomed team where it goes to the other side. So you got to get alignment, all around.

Anna Grimes:

Easier said than done.

Joe Scotto:

That’s easier said than done. So what helps for us is, we will do what most referred to as a proof of value, or proof of concept. And they’re actually a little bit different. But either one is a way for them to kind of get their hands on the product, to actually see what’s inside their network, to see what’s vulnerable. And when they get that view, lots of times they just go, oh my god, I have to have this. And so that helps to drive the decision and push it over the edge for sure.

Anna Grimes:

So give them a little bite of the apple?

Joe Scotto:

Absolutely.

Anna Grimes:

Got it.

Mark Whitlock:

And you’re getting ready to give lots of different customers a bite of the apple coming up here at the HIMSS convention in just over a month of CyberMDX is going to be there in force. Because you guys are sponsoring the Cybersecurity Command Center at HIMSS and are going to have a large presence here. What are you thinking about? What is going to be different at this HIMSS than in past HIMSS on addressing your customers and leading them to the point where you want to get them when they leave your booth?

Joe Scotto:

So it’s funny you say that, the first thing that pops to my mind is what’s going to be different is they’re going to be at a live event. So, yeah, for sure that’s on everybody’s mind. This was something that was an unknown, but it’s going to be a live event in Vegas. They’re basically mandating everybody to be vaccinated. And that’s all exciting. So we’re just first of all excited to be there. We are the overall premier Cybersecurity Command Center sponsor.

Joe Scotto:

I would say the thing that’s going to make us different this year is we are doing a number of presentations and just activities with both customers and partners. So we have one presentation that we’re doing with a customer of ours, at Englewood Hospital in Englewood, New Jersey, so we’re really excited about that. And then, partners are really key to just sort of this market in general, because you want to reach your partners in different ways. So we talked about the marketing programs that do that. But obviously, the partners are critical. And so one of our pods is going to be showcasing Philips cybersecurity services, which we are part of. So Philips has a cybersecurity service and CyberMDX is a core part of that whole holistic solution. So that’s one thing we’re really excited about in partnership with Philips, and just being there with the team there.

Joe Scotto:

In addition, we have a presentation we’re doing with Amazon Web Services. So there’s that piece of, not of our partners, Microsoft, there’s going to be tons of partners that are going to be there. So that’s, I think, different for us in terms of the level of engagement, the additional presentations, and just overall excitement that we have for the event.

John Farkas:

Excellent. As you are looking at HIMSS this year, and as you’ve got your ear to the ground and anticipating, what’s going to be happening, compared the past few years. What’s your sense? What do we expect them to see this year?

Joe Scotto:

I would expect there’s going to be heightened awareness and attention for the cybersecurity section of the conference. That’s one thing I expect you’ll see there. On the healthcare side, telehealth and telemedicine, I think, are getting a lot of attention. And those two worlds actually are somehow going to converge in the future. But overall, I think what’s going to be interesting is just the fact that this is the first event. This is actually aside from the fact that it’s HIMSS. I’m just curious to see how this is all going to work. And I think everybody else is going to be I mean, you just can’t deny the fact that we’ve just been through a pandemic and this event was canceled last year. I’m just really curious as to how everything is going to happen and how the conversations are going to go. I expect people are going to be really upbeat.

Joe Scotto:

And I think people have been champing at the bit to be with people, it’s a reality. And I think it’s going to be a great vibe, I really do. I’m fully expecting that everybody’s going to be in a really happy mood, there’s not going to be any Malays, about going to trade shows. It’s going to be the opposite. It’s going to be like everybody’s going to the first trade show they’ve ever been to. So I’m really looking forward to that.

Mark Whitlock:

That’s great.

John Farkas:

So get your vaccine card and get your plane ticket and go make plans to see Joe and his team.

Joe Scotto:

Please do come to our booth.

John Farkas:

I’ll be there.

Mark Whitlock:

Joe, we’re so grateful for you to be on Studio CMO with us today. Thanks for joining us.

Joe Scotto:

My pleasure. Thank you.

Mark Whitlock:

And as we’ve mentioned, not only a CyberMDX going to have a huge presence at HIMSS, Studio CMO and Golden Spiral will be there. And we are hosting a breakfast for Marketing Leaders, if you want to sit down and just have a small conversation with your peers about the challenges of marketing in HealthTech. There’ll be a forum on our show notes, come on over to studiocmo.com/056, that’s studiocmo.com/056. You’ll get to meet John, Anna and me and sit down and again a small group of people eight or so to talk about the challenges of marketing in HealthTech and while you’re at the show notes, look for the list of ways to integrate security conversations into your content for your HealthTech company. That’ll be in the show notes as well.

Mark Whitlock:

Of course, we’ll link out the CyberMDX and you can see all the great things that they’re doing. We’re going to show you the videos about how hospital hacks happen. So you can see how they communicated in those videos as well, again, studiocmo.com/056, that’s studiocmo.com/056.

Mark Whitlock:

And one of the things that Joe talked about today that John brought a yellow highlighter to is the need for empathy in our marketing messages and understanding who we’re speaking to. And that leads us to the statement that we close every podcast with that is the three core tenets of Studio CMO. First of all, to understand your buyers problems.

Anna Grimes:

Lead with an empathetic understanding.

John Farkas:

And always make your buyer the hero.

Mark Whitlock:

We’ll see you next time on Studio CMO.

Mark Whitlock:

Studio CMO is produced by Golden Spiral: market positioning and demand generation for HealthTech. We are an agency dedicated to help you realize your market potential. Our music is from Bigger Story music, a BMG music library. Whatever story you’re trying to tell, Bigger Story has the perfect music to make it better. Really. Check them out at biggerstorymusic.com.